Frozen Yogurt Tubes (keto Go-Gurts or Yo-Sqeezers) ***UPDATED 5/23/13***

Frozen Yogurt Tubes (keto Go-Gurts or Yo-Sqeezers) ***UPDATED 5/23/13***

Making home-made yogurt tubes is not the quickest process, however I can think of numerous occasions where I would have LOVED to have a keto meal ready-made, in a tube, frozen and ready to eat.  I can't think of a better meal to send with a keto kid to school, camp, grandparents houses, birthday parties, picnics, the beach, you name it.  After these are made, you can throw them in a cooler with ice packs and hit the road (just remember a small pair of scissors to open it!)

Here is the process broken down step by step.  It took a little trial and error to get the right size tube for my particular recipe, and there is definitely a little more waste of the food saver bags than I care for... but to have this in the freezer and be able to travel with it is worth it in my opinion.

***UPDATE***  A new, MUCH EASIER way of making these pops is now available! Please click here to order Zipzicle bags (pictured above).  OR you can continue with the original method ;)

 

Step 1

Make the yogurt. The recipe I am using is my fruit yogurt.  This is a peach version.  Please not that this has changed slightly since our move since my brand of cream is different.  I was using Organic Valley Cream, but now I'm using Trader Joe's which is 40%.  The entire serving of the recipe is 118 grams, the how much needs to fit inside the yogurt tube, WITH room to spare for it to seal properly.

3.5:1 Ratio

about 290 calories

21g peaches

15g 40% heavy cream

62g Stonyfield Yogurt, Plain Whole Milk

10g walnut oil

10g coconut oil

Again, total weight is 118g per serving. This is how much you need to fit into the tube.

I use a blender to make a large batch of yogurt.  You will lose a few grams of it in the process, if this concerns you, you will have to puree the peaches separately then mix each serving separately as well.

I make 6 serving at a time.  Multiply each ingredient by 6 and blend it all together in the blender until it is completely smooth.  It helps to have the coconut oil melted when you first mix the batch of yogurt.  This will help it incorporate completely.

Step 2

Make the yogurt tubes. Make a tube bigger than you think the first time, so you get an idea of how much space your recipe needs.

To held enough for this recipe, you will need a roll of 11 inch FoodSaver plastic.  For each tube, you need about 4.5 inches.  Once you have cut the first length, seal the first side. When the Foodsaver starts to "suck" to remove any moisture or air, hit the stop button to by-pass this and go straight to the heat sealing step.  You should have this...

Next seal the other side.  Again, hit the stop button to stop the air removal.  Now you have an empty tube that is sealed on all 4 sides. The middle portion is where the yogurt will go and it as about 2 inches across.

Trim one of the short ends (factory sealed edges) to make the top opening.

Put the empty tube in a tall cup on your scale and ZERO the scale. Use a funnel or just hold the tube open with one hand and carefully pour in the yogurt mixture (whoops, first tube I made was too small! Do you see it only weighs 86g?)  If you over fill, use a syringe to remove any extra.

This is why you need at least 2 inches extra room at the top.  Now you have to seal the top opening.  I had no problem sliding in the extra and getting it to seal. Make sure you hit the stop button to prevent it from sucking out the yogurt!!!! Now you should have this...

Trim the extra off the sides and put it in the freezer.

You could put anything in here, it doesn't have to be yogurt..., pudding, applesauce, ice creams, really anything that is pureed.  After eating the frozen pop, if there is anything remaining in the plastic I would recommend adding a small amount of water and swishing it around.  You would have to then drink the water... or cut it open and let the kids lick it out ( I know my kids would not have a problem with that!)

Also... did you know, you can re-seal store-bought yogurt tubes!  The only downside it that they are much smaller and only hold 56g. After cutting off the top and taking into consideration the room needed to re-seal, your recipe could only be about 30g total weight.  If you have a fruit puree or need small 50 or 100 calorie snacks, these might work for you!

 

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Product Review: Hamilton Beach Half Pint Ice Cream Maker

Product Review: Hamilton Beach Half Pint Ice Cream Maker

I'll save you time if you don't want to read the whole review, DON'T BUY THIS PRODUCT!  I really wanted this product to work.  In fact, I have purchased this little machine twice now, it just looks so keto friendly; it's small, it comes in fun colors for kids, it looks easy to use, you can take the cordless one anywhere, ect, ect... However, I have now spent more money on wasted ingredients than I have on the total cost of both machines.

Last summer I bought the model with the cord, this summer I thought maybe they improved the overall design when they came out with a model that takes batteries.  Nothing has changed since last summer except for the fact that you now have to pay for batteries and you only get 1 freezer bowl instead of 2. I tried several different ice cream recipes, one with heavy cream and whole milk, one with heavy cream and coconut milk and just straight coconut milk.  I just could not get any keto recipe to turn out.

In my opinion, the biggest problem with this product is the fact that the lid does not attach to the bowl.  Once you add ice cream to the bowl and begin to churn, the liquid starts to freeze to the sides of the bowl.  This is how ice cream makers are supposed to work!  However, as the paddle attachment spins around in the bowl, it is supposed to scrape the frozen cream OFF the sides and repeat the process until the entire mixture has frozen.  Can you see the lid lifting up from the bowl?  It should be sitting flush against the silver edge of the bowl.



With this model, the ice cream will freeze to the sides of the bowl and continue to form a thin layer of frozen ice cream, one on top of another.  The paddle does not scrape the layers off, resulting in the lid gradually rising up higher and higher until the lid is spinning and the paddle is doing nothing.  All you are left with is a layer of frozen solid ice cream filled with a center of liquid ice cream.  Can you see the layer of frozen ice cream around the edges of the bowl?  This was about 15 minutes into the churning process (the ice cream should have been done according to the directions). This is also partly a result of the ketogenic recipe. Sugar is an important factor in ice cream making that keeps the final product softer. Since there is no sugar in ketogenic ice cream, it will always freeze harder.



In the directions it states that you may have to "apply gentle pressure" to the lid to keep it from doing this.  Of course I did this, but it made no difference.  In fact, the amount of pressure it needs to scrape the bowl is enough to make the paddle stop spinning; the motor is just not strong enough.

So my final recommendation is DON"T BUY THIS MACHINE!

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